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East Bay’s Capt. Sullenberger tweets Flight 1549 anniversary

East Bay's Capt. Sullenberger tweets Flight 1549 anniversary

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On Tuesday afternoon, Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III tweeted from his @Captsully Twitter account, recounting his reminiscences of the fateful Jan. 15, 2009, aircraft crash in New York Metropolis’s Hudson River.

Sullenberger, a Danville resident, managed to land his US Airways Airbus A320 jet within the river after it struck a flock of birds throughout take-off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport, inflicting engine issues.

All 150 passengers aboard have been safely rescued as a result of his fast response and calm actions, which drew reward and commendations from officers and group members.

Utilizing the hashtag “#Flight1549,” Sullenberger despatched out the moment-by-moment response he and his co-pilot Jeff Skiles made to the aircraft’s points.

“I’ve felt an enormous responsibility to use the voice this event has given me for good; and I’m not done yet,” Sullenberger tweeted Tuesday. “I’ll proceed to advocate for the security of the touring public, for aviation security and affected person security, and different points and causes I’m captivated with.

“Ten years later, these are the issues that stick with me: the professionalism of the crew and air visitors controllers, the cooperation of passengers, the bravery of the rescuers and first responders, and the enduring love of my household, and I rejoice them each day.’

10 years in the past at the moment the lives of everybody on #Flight1549 modified eternally. I supply my recollections right here in a collection of tweets that I’ve written for my staff to ship out immediately.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I started a four-day journey on Monday, 1/12/09 in Charlotte, the place I met First Officer Jeff Skiles for the primary time. Wednesday night time we had an extended layover in Pittsburgh. I later discovered Jeff went to see Clint Eastwood’s “Gran Torino.” (Eastwood would direct “Sully.”) #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Thursday, January 15, 2009, began like 10,00zero different days. It was snowing in Pittsburgh and our aircraft needed to be deiced. I hoped the climate would cooperate so I might get house to California that night. We made it to LaGuardia just a few minutes not on time. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

In my baggage onboard #Flight1549, I had a library e-book – “Just Culture: Balancing Safety and Accountability” by Sidney Dekker; an fascinating coincidence that may be talked about later. pic.twitter.com/O7illh8oW7

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I nonetheless have the gasoline slip from #Flight1549. After a quick cease we have been able to go. pic.twitter.com/SBghL3uPe2

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:24:54: First Officer Jeff Skiles and I have been prepared and LaGuardia tower cleared our flight – recognized as “Cactus 1549” – for takeoff. And like almost each different flight I’d had for 42 years, #Flight1549 was utterly routine and unremarkable – for the primary 100 seconds.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:26:00 Air Visitors Controller Patrick Harten: “Cactus 1549, New York departure, radar contact, climb and maintain one five thousand.”

15:26:03 Me: “maintain one five thousand Cactus 1549.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:27:07 Me: “after takeoff checklist complete.”

I noticed the birds three seconds earlier than we struck them; we have been touring 316 ft per second and couldn’t keep away from them.

15:27:10 Me: “Birds.”
15:27:11 Jeff: “Whoa.”
15:27:12 Jeff: “Oh sh&*.”
15:27:13 Me: “Oh yeah.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

We might really feel and listen to the thumps and thuds as we struck the birds, adopted by a shuddering, after which a rumbling sound coming from the engines. We felt them rolling again.

15:27:15 Me: “We got one rol- both of ‘em rolling back.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Because the engines rolled again, they made probably the most sickening, pit-of-your-stomach sound, “whoooooooo” as they ran down. It was a sudden, full, symmetrical lack of thrust. I had by no means skilled something prefer it earlier than.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Inside two and a half seconds, I had begun to take the primary two remedial actions by reminiscence. I turned on the engine ignition and began the plane’s auxiliary energy unit.

15:27:18 Me: “Ignition, start.”
15:27:21 Me: “I’m starting the APU.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

The engine ignition would permit the engines to get well if they might. The APU would offer a backup supply of electrical energy, particularly necessary in a fly-by-wire airplane just like the Airbus A320, the place there’s not a direct mechanical connection to the controls. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I took management of the plane as Jeff and I accomplished verbatim the essential switch of plane management protocol:

15:27:23 Me: “My aircraft.”
15:27:24 Jeff: “Your aircraft.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Despite the fact that Jeff and I had simply met for the primary time three days earlier than, should you had watched us work collectively, you’d have thought we had been for years, as a result of we have been capable of collaborate wordlessly in an emergency when there was not time to speak about it.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:27:25: The cockpit space mic captured the sound of the igniters. The investigation revealed the engines have been irreparably broken and by no means would have regained thrust.

15:27:28 Me (to Jeff): “Get the QRH [Quick Reference Handbook], loss of thrust on both engines.”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I nonetheless keep in mind my first three ideas. First, “This can’t be happening,” a really typical thought, rooted in disbelief. Second, “This doesn’t happen to me.” All my earlier flights had been principally routine. I had by no means been so challenged in an airplane that I doubted the result.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

My third thought was extra of a realization – in contrast to all these different flights, this one would in all probability not finish on a runway with the plane undamaged. I knew I had seconds to provide you with a plan, minutes to execute.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I knew each determination we made can be examined by the investigators and debated for years by different aviation professionals. The NTSB would spend as much as a yr and a half interviewing everybody concerned in our flight, analyzing all the info.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

They might be scrutinizing each thought I had, each selection I made, each syllable I uttered, each motion I took or didn’t take. However I didn’t let this data dissuade me from making exhausting decisions and sticking with them.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Within the cabin, the flight attendants heard the noise, and assumed it was a fowl strike and we have been going to return to LaGuardia. The cabin was quiet, with no engine noise; however the passengers have been calm – that they had no concept the seriousness of the state of affairs.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:27:32 Me: “Mayday mayday mayday. Uh this uh Cactus fifteen thirty nine hit birds, we’ve lost thrust in both engines we’re turning back towards LaGuardia.”

Patrick instantly started to attempt to get us again to a runway at LaGuardia.#Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/TemoKjCG8j

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

15:28:05 Patrick: “Cactus fifteen twenty nine, if we can get it for you do you want to try to land runway one three?”

(Within the stress of the second each Patrick and I acquired the flight quantity incorrect.)

15:28:10 Me: “We’re unable. We may end up in the Hudson.”#Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/0uC7WBbqzN

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Patrick was nonetheless decided to attempt to discover a option to get us to a runway. I requested him about Teterboro off our proper. He instantly started to rearrange a touchdown there, however I shortly realized we couldn’t make it there both.#Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/p8cPlrZv5U

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I knew if I set the airplane down on the river and will hold it intact, the boats and ferries would come to our rescue.

15:29:28 (two minutes and 18 seconds after the hen strike)

Me: “We’re gonna be in the Hudson.”

Patrick: “I’m sorry say again Cactus?”#Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/xuF0qX1Ctw

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

This was a novel occasion that we had by no means educated for. In our flight simulators it was not attainable to follow a water touchdown. But, I used to be capable of set clear priorities. I took what I did know, tailored it, and utilized it in a brand new solution to clear up an issue I’d by no means seen earlier than.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

We didn’t have sufficient altitude and velocity (complete power) to make it to any runway, so I engaged in objective sacrificing. I used to be prepared to sacrifice the airplane to save lots of lives.#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I noticed the one different place in the complete New York Metropolitan space, probably the most densely populated and developed areas on the planet, that was lengthy sufficient, vast sufficient, and clean sufficient to even try touchdown a big, quick, heavy jet airliner was the Hudson River.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I had time to make just one announcement to the passengers and crew, and earlier than I made what I knew can be an important announcement of my life, I took what was in all probability an extravagant period of time, three or 4 seconds, to decide on my phrases very rigorously. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I needed to sound assured as a result of I knew braveness may be contagious. In our aviation vocabulary there are specific single phrases which are wealthy with which means. “Brace” is such a phrase. And I selected the phrase “impact” to provide passengers and crew alike a vivid picture of what to anticipate.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I stated, “This is the Captain. Brace for impact.” Instantly, I heard the flight attendants begin shouting their instructions to the passengers – “Brace, brace, brace! Heads down! Stay down!”#Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

The cockpit warnings have been sounding. A computerized voice repeated, “too low, terrain, too low, terrain… caution terrain… pull up, pull up, pull up.”

23 seconds earlier than the touchdown, I requested Jeff a query.

15:30:21 Me: “Got any ideas?”
15:30:23 Jeff: “Actually not.”

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I used to be asking him what else we might do to save lots of lives. That we might have this change in center of such a disaster is simply a sign of how properly we had discovered our staff expertise on the airline. Jeff answered the best way he did as a result of he knew we had accomplished all we might. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Jeff intuitively knew he ought to assist me decide the peak above the river to start the touchdown by calling out airspeed and altitude. Whereas the impression was exhausting, I might inform the aircraft was intact and floating. Jeff and I stated virtually in unison – “That wasn’t as bad as I thought.” pic.twitter.com/RqWJDn4Nxe

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Although we’d solved the primary huge drawback – getting the aircraft down intact, there was a dangerous evacuation and rescue forward of us. Whereas Jeff went by way of the evacuation guidelines, I opened the cockpit door and shouted “Evacuate!” #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Even on this sudden disaster, the flight attendants instantly drew upon years of coaching and commenced the evacuation. Passengers started submitting out onto the wings and into the rafts on the entrance doorways. The again doorways have been under the waterline; the aft rafts have been ineffective. #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/JbGH4gjH1R

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

It was January in NY, on the frigid Hudson River. The air temperature was 21, 11 with the windchill; the water temperature was 36. The primary ferry arrived inside 4 minutes. #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/Sma1l0Kyqm

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

When it appeared everybody was out of the cabin, I walked down the middle aisle, shouting: “Is anyone there? Come forward!” I walked up and down twice, to make certain nobody can be left behind. The second time the water was so excessive I received moist virtually to my waist. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

By the point I left the plane because the final one off, the ferries have been throughout us and the rescue was nicely underway. I attempted desperately to get a rely of individuals within the rafts and on the wings, however it was unimaginable. #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/Fpchb7I4Vm

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

On the deck of the ferry I noticed my cellphone was dry; my first name was to US Airways. The airline operations supervisor who answered abruptly informed me he couldn’t speak as a result of they “had a plane down in the Hudson.” I stated “I know. I’m the guy.” #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/0HmB1whsW3

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

For the primary time I considered my circle of relatives. I referred to as Lorrie to inform her the surprising information. She wasn’t conscious of it. I advised her I used to be okay, couldn’t speak, however would name her once more later, as I had duties to carry out. She picked up our women at college earlier than they heard the information.

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Passengers have been taken to NY and NJ. Some, together with myself, have been taken to hospitals to be evaluated. I used to be nonetheless making an attempt to get a rely of passengers. Lastly, 4 hours after our touchdown, I acquired the quantity I used to be in search of: 155. All aboard survived. #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/Qwi8xd4BXo

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

What adopted within the days and weeks after the touchdown was nothing in need of extraordinary. We heard from individuals everywhere in the world who discovered hope and inspiration within the story of #Flight1549. Many noticed it as a bookend to a decade that began in NY with the 9/11 assaults. pic.twitter.com/9yyg9RJehe

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

I’ve felt an unlimited duty to make use of the voice this occasion has given me for good; and I’m not completed but. I’ll proceed to advocate for the security of the touring public, for aviation security and affected person security, and different points and causes I’m keen about. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Ten years later, these are the issues that stick with me: the professionalism of the crew and air visitors controllers, the cooperation of passengers, the bravery of the rescuers and first responders, and the enduring love of my household, and I have fun them day-after-day. #Flight1549 pic.twitter.com/z8i6QGirKN

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

We proved what is feasible when a devoted group of individuals rises to the event, remembers their widespread humanity, and works collectively. Once we do this, there’s little we can’t accomplish. #Flight1549

— Sully Sullenberger (@Captsully) January 15, 2019

Contact George Kelly at 408-859-5180.